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March 2022

Tax season is now underway! In this month's newsletter, we share the secret to getting a quick tax refund.

Also read about tax saving tips for parents and grandparents, why you should consider reading the fine print, and several financial tips about how to navigate rising interest rates.

Please enjoy the information, and pass along articles of interest to all your family and friends. And as always, please call if you have questions or need help.

Contents

The Secret to a Quick Tax Refund

Here's how to get your overpayment as soon as possible

Avoid Getting Stuck in the IRSs Historic Backlog imageDelayed tax refunds, penalties for not filing 2020 tax returns on time that were actually filed on time, and timely tax payments being flagged as late are just some of the headaches taxpayers are grappling with due to a massive backlog of several million unprocessed tax returns the IRS is trying to wade out from under.

Here's how to avoid getting your tax refund delayed and steer clear from late-filing and payment penalties resulting from the IRS backlog:

What you need to know


Read the Fine Print

According to a recent Deloitte survey, 91 percent of people agree to terms and conditions without reading the legal agreement. While reading through legally complex language may be slow and painful, it’s more important than you think. Here are four reasons why reading entire legal agreements make sense:

Read the Fine Print imageYou miss a major technicality. Many agreements have an exit penalty that requires you to pay for a period of time after you terminate an agreement. Others automatically renew your agreement for a year with exit penalties unless you tell them in writing you do not wish to renew prior to a key date. In a recent example of missing a legal technicality, eight teachers claimed the Department of Education (DOE) mishandled a debt forgiveness program that promised to reduce student loans after 10 years of public service. In most of the cases, the teacher’s application was denied because, according to the DOE, they were in the wrong type of loan or payment program.

You give something away. With extensive agreement documents (PayPal’s user agreement is over 50 pages long!), it’s easy for a company to add language that grants itself rights to something that’s yours. Here are some examples:

You're not comfortable with the risks. Data breaches are occurring more often and are hard to prevent. To reduce their exposure to litigation, businesses are continuing to add language to agreements to protect themselves. Your job, as the consumer, is to know these risks when signing up for a new service. The more personal information you provide, the more important it is to understand your legal recourse if the supplier of your service is hacked.

You miss something good. Reading an agreement to the end may pay off. A woman in Georgia won $10,000 just by reading her travel insurance agreement. The company, SquareMouth, had a "Pays to Read" program that awarded a cash prize to the first person to read the clause with a cash prize. For most people, it’s more likely you’ll find additional benefits that come with the agreement or laugh at some humor injected by the company.


Tax Saving Tips for Parents AND Grandparents

Leveraging the kiddie tax rules

With careful tax planning, you can use the kiddie tax rules to reduce your tax obligation. Here’s what you need to know.

Tax Saving Tips for Parents AND Grandparents imageBackground

The term kiddie tax was introduced by the Tax Reform Act of 1986. The rules are intended to keep parents from shifting their investment income to their children to have it taxed at their child's lower tax rate. In 2022 the law requires a child's unearned income (generally dividends, interest, and capital gains) above $2,300 be taxed at their parent's tax rate.

Who the Kiddie Tax Applies To

  • Children under the age of 18
  • Full-time students under the age of 24 and providing less than half of their own financial support
  • Children with unearned incomes above $2,300

Who/What the Kiddie Tax Does NOT Apply To

  • Earned income (wages and self-employed income from things like babysitting or paper routes)
  • Children that are age 18 or older and have earnings providing more than half of their support
  • Gifts received by your child during the year

How the Kiddie Tax Works

  • The first $1,150 of unearned income is generally tax-free
  • The next $1,150 of unearned income is taxed at the child's (usually lower) tax rate
  • The excess over $2,300 is taxed at the parent's rate.

Tax Planning With the Kiddie Tax Rules

While your child's unearned income above $2,300 is a problem, you will still want to leverage the tax advantage up to this amount. Here are some ideas:

Properly managed, the kiddie tax rules can be used to your advantage. But be careful, this part of the tax code can create an unwelcome surprise if not handled properly.


Review Financial Decisions When Interest Rates Change

Review financial decisions when interest rates change imageInterest rates are expected to increase this year in response to inflation that is running at a 40-year high. How will you be affected?

Any interest rate revision can cause a ripple effect throughout the economy. Accordingly, the Federal Reserve’s actions probably will exert at least a moderate influence over financial choices that you may make at home and in your business in 2022 and beyond.

Savings and debt

As a consumer, you stand to gain from rising interest rates because you’ll likely earn a better return on your deposits. Over the last ten years, placing your money in a certificate of deposit or passbook savings account has been hardly more profitable than stuffing it under a mattress. On the other hand, the cost of borrowing money will likely increase. As a result, mortgages, car loans, and credit cards will demand higher interest rates. That’s not a big deal if you’re already locked into low-interest fixed-rate loans. But if you have a variable rate loan or carry balances on your credit cards, you may find your monthly payments starting to increase.

Investments

On the investment front, market volatility may increase because rate increases are not completely predictable. Market sectors will likely exhibit varied responses to changes in interest rates. Those sectors that are less dependent on discretionary income may be less affected – after all, you need to buy gas, clothes, and groceries regardless of changes in interest rates.

As you adjust your financial plan, you might only need to make minor changes. Staying the course with a well-diversified retirement portfolio is still a prudent strategy. However, you may want to review your investment allocations.

Your Business

Rising interest rates can also affect your business. If your company’s balance sheet has variable-rate debt, rising interest rates can affect your bottom line and possibly your plans for growth. As the cost of borrowing increases, taking out loans for new equipment or financing expansion with credit may become less desirable.

Please call if you have questions about deciding on the most beneficial response to potential future changes in interest rates.



Newsletter Archive

Please note: Some material may be time-sensitive and may no longer apply.
Please contact us with any questions.
  1. Posted on: 2022-09-06
  2. Posted on: 2022-08-02
  3. Posted on: 2022-07-05
  4. Posted on: 2022-05-31
  5. Posted on: 2022-05-03
  6. Posted on: 2022-04-05
  7. Posted on: 2022-02-01
  8. Posted on: 2022-01-04
  9. Posted on: 2021-11-30
  10. Posted on: 2021-11-02
  11. Posted on: 2021-10-05